IN THE FRAME

Getting To Know 
Peter Do 

The latest episode of IN THE FRAME, our video series dedicated 
to emerging talent, invites you inside the studio of the most 
talked-about new designer in fashion right now.
Editorial Image
IN THE FRAME

Getting To Know 
Peter Do 

The latest episode of IN THE FRAME, our video series dedicated 
to emerging talent, invites you inside the studio of the most 
talked-about new designer in fashion right now.
Editorial Image
IN THE FRAME

Getting To Know 
Peter Do 

The latest episode of IN THE FRAME, our video series dedicated to emerging talent, invites you inside the studio of the most talked-about new designer in fashion right now.
IN THE FRAME

Getting To Know 
Peter Do 

The latest episode of IN THE FRAME, our video series dedicated to emerging talent, invites you inside the studio of the most talked-about new designer in fashion right now.
 
So, who is Peter Do? Try searching for recent pictures and you’ll draw a blank: he refuses to show his face—not on Instagram, not on his website, and not even for features about him, like this one. “There’s so much celebrity in fashion,” the New York designer says, a soft accent revealing his Vietnamese roots. “I want us to be known for the work that we do.”
 
 
So, who is Peter Do? Try searching for recent pictures and you’ll draw a blank: he refuses to show his face—not on Instagram, not on his website, and not even for features about him, like this one. “There’s so much celebrity in fashion,” the New York designer says, a soft accent revealing his Vietnamese roots. “I want us to be known for the work that we do.”
 
VIDEO by ANDREW ROTHSCHILD
VIDEO by ANDREW ROTHSCHILD
PHOTOGRAPHY by ENRICO BRUNETTI
PHOTOGRAPHY by ENRICO BRUNETTI
VIDEO by ANDREW ROTHSCHILD
VIDEO by ANDREW ROTHSCHILD
PHOTOGRAPHY by ENRICO BRUNETTI
PHOTOGRAPHY by ENRICO BRUNETTI
Note the words “us” and “we.” While the brand bears his name, Peter Do is very much a family affair. It’s run by Do and his four friends, a tight-knit group all of whom were once disgruntled with their jobs in the fashion industry. “I was like, 'you hate selling, you don’t like doing tech patterns… do you want to start a brand together?,’” he recalls. Over the course of a year, the group—now known as the “founding five”—would gather every weekend in Do’s Brooklyn apartment to refine their vision. They officially launched under the moniker “Peter Do” in 2018.


Note the words “us” and “we.” While the brand bears his name, Peter Do is very much a family affair. It’s run by Do and his four friends, a tight-knit group all of whom were once disgruntled with their jobs in the fashion industry. “I was like, 'you hate selling, you don’t like doing tech patterns… do you want to start a brand together?,’” he recalls. Over the course of a year, the group—now known as the “founding five”—would gather every weekend in Do’s Brooklyn apartment to refine their vision. They officially launched under the moniker “Peter Do” in 2018.


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“There’s so much celebrity in fashion, I want us to be known for the work that we do.”

PETER DO
 


 
“There’s so much celebrity in fashion, I want us to be known for the work that we do.”

PETER DO
 


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Editorial Image

Two years in, with stockists around the globe, glowing reviews on Vogue (it’s worth noting that Peter Do does not advertise), and a rapidly-growing Instagram following, they’ve achieved considerable success. Yet the team has remained small with just eight people, plus four (fastidiously chosen) interns. “It’s not about having lots of people,” Do says. “It’s about having the right people.”

Quality over quantity is something of a brand motto. “We have a very edited collection,” Do explains, while gesturing to the neat racks of their signature staples: trousers, deconstructed blazers, trench coats, and transformational knits all laced with that distinctive “Peter Do” edge. Everything is tailored. The goal, according to Do, is to “eliminate puffers, sweatpants, hoodies, and Ugg boots from people’s wardrobes”. Uggs, I can get behind, but what’s he got against puffers? “I don’t think puffers are the only way to stay warm,” he says. “If a coat is made properly, then it should be warm.”
 


Two years in, with stockists around the globe, glowing reviews on Vogue (it’s worth noting that Peter Do does not advertise), and a rapidly-growing Instagram following, they’ve achieved considerable success. Yet the team has remained small with just eight people, plus four (fastidiously chosen) interns. “It’s not about having lots of people,” Do says. “It’s about having the right people.”

Quality over quantity is something of a brand motto. “We have a very edited collection,” Do explains, while gesturing to the neat racks of their signature staples: trousers, deconstructed blazers, trench coats, and transformational knits all laced with that distinctive “Peter Do” edge. Everything is tailored. The goal, according to Do, is to “eliminate puffers, sweatpants, hoodies, and Ugg boots from people’s wardrobes”. Uggs, I can get behind, but what’s he got against puffers? “I don’t think puffers are the only way to stay warm,” he says. “If a coat is made properly, then it should be warm.”
 

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Seeing such high-level craft while working at Céline inspired me to build something of my own here in New York.”

PETER DO






Seeing such high-level craft while working at Céline inspired me to build something of my own here in New York.”

PETER DO



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Editorial Image


“Wardrobe malfunctions,” such as poorly-insulated coats, are Do’s chief source of inspiration. He’s an obsessive people-watcher, constantly looking for ways to improve their daily uniforms. “Each season, we identify a problem—like too much bulk in a sweater or not enough movement in an arm—and try to solve it,” he says, opening up a blazer to reveal a vertical inside pocket. (Women’s blazers have horizontal pockets—that is, if they have pockets at all—but Do flipped his because “it’s more natural for your hand to slide in vertically.”) Inconspicuous luxuries like these may escape the untrained eye, but they come to life when worn. And they’re what the label excels in.




“Wardrobe malfunctions,” such as poorly-insulated coats, are Do’s chief source of inspiration. He’s an obsessive people-watcher, constantly looking for ways to improve their daily uniforms. “Each season, we identify a problem—like too much bulk in a sweater or not enough movement in an arm—and try to solve it,” he says, opening up a blazer to reveal a vertical inside pocket. (Women’s blazers have horizontal pockets—that is, if they have pockets at all—but Do flipped his because “it’s more natural for your hand to slide in vertically.”) Inconspicuous luxuries like these may escape the untrained eye, but they come to life when worn. And they’re what the label excels in.


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“My job is not to impose a fantasy on women, it’s to ask, ‘how can I make your life easier?,’” says Do, who credits Phoebe Philo with this approach. After winning the prestigious LVMH prize during his last year at FIT, Do was offered a post at any one of the luxury French houses. He chose Céline and immediately moved to Paris. “I learned to make real clothes, actual clothes that women want to wear,” he recalls. “It was about creating a wardrobe that gives women stability, a comfort zone, a sort of safety net so that they can get on with their lives.”



“My job is not to impose a fantasy on women, it’s to ask, ‘how can I make your life easier?,’” says Do, who credits Phoebe Philo with this approach. After winning the prestigious LVMH prize during his last year at FIT, Do was offered a post at any one of the luxury French houses. He chose Céline and immediately moved to Paris. “I learned to make real clothes, actual clothes that women want to wear,” he recalls. “It was about creating a wardrobe that gives women stability, a comfort zone, a sort of safety net so that they can get on with their lives.”

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“My job is not to impose a fantasy on women, it’s to ask, ‘how can I make your life easier'?”

PETER DO

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“My job is not to impose a fantasy on women, it’s to ask, ‘how can I make your life easier'?”

PETER DO



The challenge lies in making those ordinary, everyday pieces extraordinarily desirable (such was the magic of Philo). It requires creativity, which Do has in spades (his signature four-piece suit includes a pleated skirt). But perhaps most important is a millimeter-oriented appetency for perfection. Do and the team work directly onto the body, in fittings that go on for hours on end. “If we don’t get it right, I’ll cancel it,” he says, referencing a trench coat from FW '20 that took years to perfect. “This season, we finally got it right.”
 

To reveal the meticulous workmanship behind his creations, Do developed a sheer fabric known as “spacer.” Spongy and neoprene-like, it carries the ethereal lightness of tulle yet is shockingly hardy—able to withstand even the tumble dryer. It’s become the office uniform. The team layers A-line spacer-cut coats over (mostly) black tailoring and Margiela Tabi boots. It paints a striking picture, a kind of futuristic throwback to the traditional “chemises” found in the Haute Couture houses of Paris.
 



The challenge lies in making those ordinary, everyday pieces extraordinarily desirable (such was the magic of Philo). It requires creativity, which Do has in spades (his signature four-piece suit includes a pleated skirt). But perhaps most important is a millimeter-oriented appetency for perfection. Do and the team work directly onto the body, in fittings that go on for hours on end. “If we don’t get it right, I’ll cancel it,” he says, referencing a trench coat from FW '20 that took years to perfect. “This season, we finally got it right.”
 

To reveal the meticulous workmanship behind his creations, Do developed a sheer fabric known as “spacer.” Spongy and neoprene-like, it carries the ethereal lightness of tulle yet is shockingly hardy—able to withstand even the tumble dryer. It’s become the office uniform. The team layers A-line spacer-cut coats over (mostly) black tailoring and Margiela Tabi boots. It paints a striking picture, a kind of futuristic throwback to the traditional “chemises” found in the Haute Couture houses of Paris.
 

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“Seeing such high-level craft while working at Céline inspired me to build something of my own here in New York,” says Do. The studio, a light and airy though by no means vast space, is located in South Brooklyn's Industry City. Despite the setting, the team has managed to foster a rarefied atmosphere. Watching them at work, a symbiotic orchestra of white coats with Do as their conductor, is quite a beautiful sight. “One of our main goals is to build an atelier, to bring craftsmanship and garment-making back again,” says Do. Sounds like they’re already halfway there.


“Seeing such high-level craft while working at Céline inspired me to build something of my own here in New York,” says Do. The studio, a light and airy though by no means vast space, is located in South Brooklyn's Industry City. Despite the setting, the team has managed to foster a rarefied atmosphere. Watching them at work, a symbiotic orchestra of white coats with Do as their conductor, is quite a beautiful sight. “One of our main goals is to build an atelier, to bring craftsmanship and garment-making back again,” says Do. Sounds like they’re already halfway there.
WORDS by TATIANA HAMBRO

WORDS by TATIANA HAMBRO

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Editorial Image