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The Style Out 


It may sound simple, but we all know getting dressed can be a complicated affair. So when it comes to the art of outfit-making, who better to ask than the women who do it for a living? Here, six New York stylists and fashion editors share their go-to uniforms, the brands on their radar, and the insider tips you’ll want to make your own—stat.

Rachael Wang 


Formerly the fashion market director at Style.com and fashion director at Allure, the Chinese-American stylist now runs her own creative agency out of New York that prioritizes ethical, diverse, and sustainable practices above all else. Her work has appeared in the pages of Vogue and Document Journal as well as on the cover of The Telegraph. She’s styled lookbooks for Mara Hoffman, and figures ranging from Paloma Elsesser and Hunter Schafer to Dev Hynes and Chloë Sevigny—viewing each project as another opportunity to represent the underrepresented (both in front of and behind the camera), to champion recycled fabrics and environmentally-conscious talents, and to ultimately redress the racial and body-size inequities that riddle the industry.

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Rachael Wang 


Formerly the fashion market director at Style.com and fashion director at Allure, the Chinese-American stylist now runs her own creative agency out of New York that prioritizes ethical, diverse, and sustainable practices above all else. Her work has appeared in the pages of Vogue and Document Journal as well as on the cover of The Telegraph. She’s styled lookbooks for Mara Hoffman, and figures ranging from Paloma Elsesser and Hunter Schafer to Dev Hynes and Chloë Sevigny—viewing each project as another opportunity to represent the underrepresented (both in front of and behind the camera), to champion recycled fabrics and environmentally-conscious talents, and to ultimately redress the racial and body-size inequities that riddle the industry.

Editorial Image
Rachael Wang 


Formerly the fashion market director at Style.com and fashion director at Allure, the Chinese-American stylist now runs her own creative agency out of New York that prioritizes ethical, diverse, and sustainable practices above all else. Her work has appeared in the pages of Vogue and Document Journal as well as on the cover of The Telegraph. She’s styled lookbooks for Mara Hoffman, and figures ranging from Paloma Elsesser and Hunter Schafer to Dev Hynes and Chloë Sevigny—viewing each project as another opportunity to represent the underrepresented (both in front of and behind the camera), to champion recycled fabrics and environmentally-conscious talents, and to ultimately redress the racial and body-size inequities that riddle the industry.

Rachael Wang 


Formerly the fashion market director at Style.com and fashion director at Allure, the Chinese-American stylist now runs her own creative agency out of New York that prioritizes ethical, diverse, and sustainable practices above all else. Her work has appeared in the pages of Vogue and Document Journal as well as on the cover of The Telegraph. She’s styled lookbooks for Mara Hoffman, and figures ranging from Paloma Elsesser and Hunter Schafer to Dev Hynes and Chloë Sevigny—viewing each project as another opportunity to represent the underrepresented (both in front of and behind the camera), to champion recycled fabrics and environmentally-conscious talents, and to ultimately redress the racial and body-size inequities that riddle the industry.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT FASHION?

It's a transformative power to define the identity we wish to present to the world.
 

HOW DO YOU DEFINE YOUR STYLE?

Eclectic utility.
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

A strong tailored coat, knit dress, and chunky flat boots (this Bottega Veneta over-the-knee style is a fave) with lots of statement jewelry.


THE PANDEMIC HAS AFFORDED A TIME OF PAUSE AND REFLECTION FOR THE FASHION INDUSTRY. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE THINGS CHANGE MOVING FORWARD?

I would love to see the industry use all its creativity and innovation to find solutions to creating products that no longer exploit people or the planet.
 

WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT FASHION?

It's a transformative power to define the identity we wish to present to the world.
 

HOW DO YOU DEFINE YOUR STYLE?

Eclectic utility.
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

A strong tailored coat, knit dress, and chunky flat boots (this Bottega Veneta over-the-knee style is a fave) with lots of statement jewelry.


THE PANDEMIC HAS AFFORDED A TIME OF PAUSE AND REFLECTION FOR THE FASHION INDUSTRY. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE THINGS CHANGE MOVING FORWARD?

I would love to see the industry use all its creativity and innovation to find solutions to creating products that no longer exploit people or the planet.
 

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Editorial Image
THE WORLD’S BEST DRESSED?

Tina Chow. Or Erykah Badu, whose fearless choices always inspire.
 

FAVORITE BRANDS?

Wales Bonner,  Peter Do,  Martine Rose, Commission, Lemaire.
 

HAS QUARANTINE CHANGED WHAT YOU WEAR?

I have embraced sweatpants in a way I never imagined I could. I think next year will be about dressing for comfort and protection with a splash of drama and whimsy.
 

HOW DO YOU PLAN ON TACKLING FESTIVE DRESSING?

Chic knits and bold gold jewelry plus strappy heeled sandals for indoors.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

Personal statement jewelry will really make it your own.


THE WORLD’S BEST DRESSED?

Tina Chow. Or Erykah Badu, whose fearless choices always inspire.
 

FAVORITE BRANDS?

Wales Bonner,  Peter Do,  Martine Rose, Commission, Lemaire.
 

HAS QUARANTINE CHANGED WHAT YOU WEAR?

I have embraced sweatpants in a way I never imagined I could. I think next year will be about dressing for comfort and protection with a splash of drama and whimsy.
 

HOW DO YOU PLAN ON TACKLING FESTIVE DRESSING?

Chic knits and bold gold jewelry plus strappy heeled sandals for indoors.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

Personal statement jewelry will really make it your own.


Shibon Kennedy 


Whether she’s working on a campaign for Burberry or a cover story with Rihanna, stylist to the stars and self-described multi-hyphenate Shibon Kennedy is always championing people of color: she’s an active leader in the fight for racial justice and a member of the Black in Fashion Council. Her aesthetic? Perfectly imperfect (her words). Kennedy’s work challenges prevailing fashion narratives in favor of telling authentic and diverse stories. Just look at any number of the Fader cover shoots she’s styled—she’s the Editor-at-Large for the magazine—starring everyone from Young Thug and Kelela to SZA, Ariana Grande, Vanessa Beecroft, and Rihanna (who’s been a champion and supporter of the stylist since they met while working on Fader’s special 100th issue in 2015).

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Shibon Kennedy 


Whether she’s working on a campaign for Burberry or a cover story with Rihanna, stylist to the stars and self-described multi-hyphenate Shibon Kennedy is always championing people of color: she’s an active leader in the fight for racial justice and a member of the Black in Fashion Council. Her aesthetic? Perfectly imperfect (her words). Kennedy’s work challenges prevailing fashion narratives in favor of telling authentic and diverse stories. Just look at any number of the Fader cover shoots she’s styled—she’s the Editor-at-Large for the magazine—starring everyone from Young Thug and Kelela to SZA, Ariana Grande, Vanessa Beecroft, and Rihanna (who’s been a champion and supporter of the stylist since they met while working on Fader’s special 100th issue in 2015).

Editorial Image
Shibon Kennedy 


Whether she’s working on a campaign for Burberry or a cover story with Rihanna, stylist to the stars and self-described multi-hyphenate Shibon Kennedy is always championing people of color: she’s an active leader in the fight for racial justice and a member of the Black in Fashion Council. Her aesthetic? Perfectly imperfect (her words). Kennedy’s work challenges prevailing fashion narratives in favor of telling authentic and diverse stories. Just look at any number of the Fader cover shoots she’s styled—she’s the Editor-at-Large for the magazine—starring everyone from Young Thug and Kelela to SZA, Ariana Grande, Vanessa Beecroft, and Rihanna (who’s been a champion and supporter of the stylist since they met while working on Fader’s special 100th issue in 2015).

Shibon Kennedy 


Whether she’s working on a campaign for Burberry or a cover story with Rihanna, stylist to the stars and self-described multi-hyphenate Shibon Kennedy is always championing people of color: she’s an active leader in the fight for racial justice and a member of the Black in Fashion Council. Her aesthetic? Perfectly imperfect (her words). Kennedy’s work challenges prevailing fashion narratives in favor of telling authentic and diverse stories. Just look at any number of the Fader cover shoots she’s styled—she’s the Editor-at-Large for the magazine—starring everyone from Young Thug and Kelela to SZA, Ariana Grande, Vanessa Beecroft, and Rihanna (who’s been a champion and supporter of the stylist since they met while working on Fader’s special 100th issue in 2015).

HOW DO YOU DEFINE YOUR STYLE?

Perfectly imperfect. I love mixing high and low, designer and vintage; a strong-shouldered tailored number with a beat-up denim.
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

Blazers, denim, layers for days and my jewelry; usually with some sort of hat; and sunglasses as close to 24/7 as possible.
 

WORLD’S BEST DRESSED?

Sade is my Queen! There are so many...Tina Turner for all of it; Nina Simone for the chic boheme activist artist aesthetic; Eartha Kitt for the drama; James Baldwin for his effortless elegance. I’d like to think that if he, Tina, Nina, Eartha, and Sade had a fashion love child, maybe in some incredibly dreamy parallel universe, that fashion offspring might be me.
 

WHAT’S YOUR APPROACH TO INVESTING IN FASHION?

As my dermatologist says about Botox, there is want and there is need. None of us need any of it, but when you sleep on it multiple times, cannot stop thinking about it, have a way to pay for it, and it makes you feel the feels, I’d say it may be worth some serious consideration.
 

SOMETHING YOU’D NEVER WEAR?

Any brands I know to actively partake in and/or operate by way of anti-Black/Queer/POC dealings.


HOW DO YOU DEFINE YOUR STYLE?

Perfectly imperfect. I love mixing high and low, designer and vintage; a strong-shouldered tailored number with a beat-up denim.
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

Blazers, denim, layers for days and my jewelry; usually with some sort of hat; and sunglasses as close to 24/7 as possible.
 

WORLD’S BEST DRESSED?

Sade is my Queen! There are so many...Tina Turner for all of it; Nina Simone for the chic boheme activist artist aesthetic; Eartha Kitt for the drama; James Baldwin for his effortless elegance. I’d like to think that if he, Tina, Nina, Eartha, and Sade had a fashion love child, maybe in some incredibly dreamy parallel universe, that fashion offspring might be me.
 

WHAT’S YOUR APPROACH TO INVESTING IN FASHION?

As my dermatologist says about Botox, there is want and there is need. None of us need any of it, but when you sleep on it multiple times, cannot stop thinking about it, have a way to pay for it, and it makes you feel the feels, I’d say it may be worth some serious consideration.
 

SOMETHING YOU’D NEVER WEAR?

Any brands I know to actively partake in and/or operate by way of anti-Black/Queer/POC dealings.


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THE PANDEMIC HAS AFFORDED A TIME OF PAUSE AND REFLECTION FOR THE FASHION INDUSTRY. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE THINGS CHANGE MOVING FORWARD?

I’d like to see this not be just a moment of “trend” but one of continued commitment around representation, sustainability, and a general reworking of how the industry operates. I would love to see some major “rewiring”—more honest conversations around the consumptive nature of culture as a whole and how the fashion industry so often panders to it with little consideration of the long-term consequences; equired industry-wide standards, indexes, programs and initiatives, across the board, with objectives of moving us collectively towards a sustainably-operating industry.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

Don’t overthink it. Just ride that wave of “perfectly imperfect.” There is so much beauty in imperfection. Embracing it can really take you to some fun, unexpected, and truly brilliant stylistic places.
 
 
IS YOUR STYLE EVOLVING, OR HAVE YOU SETTLED ON A FIXED “LOOK”?

I definitely have my tried-and-true silhouettes that I wear and buy over and over again (hello blazers, trenches, and block heels), but I also love to lean into the pleats, silk, tulle, lace, and the “novelty” of it all.


THE PANDEMIC HAS AFFORDED A TIME OF PAUSE AND REFLECTION FOR THE FASHION INDUSTRY. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE THINGS CHANGE MOVING FORWARD?

I’d like to see this not be just a moment of “trend” but one of continued commitment around representation, sustainability, and a general reworking of how the industry operates. I would love to see some major “rewiring”—more honest conversations around the consumptive nature of culture as a whole and how the fashion industry so often panders to it with little consideration of the long-term consequences; equired industry-wide standards, indexes, programs and initiatives, across the board, with objectives of moving us collectively towards a sustainably-operating industry.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

Don’t overthink it. Just ride that wave of “perfectly imperfect.” There is so much beauty in imperfection. Embracing it can really take you to some fun, unexpected, and truly brilliant stylistic places.
 
 
IS YOUR STYLE EVOLVING, OR HAVE YOU SETTLED ON A FIXED “LOOK”?

I definitely have my tried-and-true silhouettes that I wear and buy over and over again (hello blazers, trenches, and block heels), but I also love to lean into the pleats, silk, tulle, lace, and the “novelty” of it all.


Mecca James-Williams 


Having worked her way up from assisting in fashion closets (her first “proper” gig was working as Giovanna Battaglia Engelbert’s first assistant while at Vogue Japan), Mecca James-Williams now runs a successful styling business spanning fashion, celebrity, beauty, and more. She’s styled politician Stacey Abrams, worked on Solange’s visual album, and has styled numerous editorial features for publications ranging from The Zoe Report to Essence and The Wall Street Journal magazine. While her subjects may vary, all her images possess a striking sense of vitality, often championing the bright colors, bold silhouettes, and energetic pairings that define her uplifting personal style.

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Mecca James-Williams 


Having worked her way up from assisting in fashion closets (her first “proper” gig was working as Giovanna Battaglia Engelbert’s first assistant while at Vogue Japan), Mecca James-Williams now runs a successful styling business spanning fashion, celebrity, beauty, and more. She’s styled politician Stacey Abrams, worked on Solange’s visual album, and has styled numerous editorial features for publications ranging from The Zoe Report to Essence and The Wall Street Journal magazine. While her subjects may vary, all her images possess a striking sense of vitality, often championing the bright colors, bold silhouettes, and energetic pairings that define her uplifting personal style.

Editorial Image
Mecca James-Williams 


Having worked her way up from assisting in fashion closets (her first “proper” gig was working as Giovanna Battaglia Engelbert’s first assistant while at Vogue Japan), Mecca James-Williams now runs a successful styling business spanning fashion, celebrity, beauty, and more. She’s styled politician Stacey Abrams, worked on Solange’s visual album, and has styled numerous editorial features for publications ranging from The Zoe Report to Essence and The Wall Street Journal magazine. While her subjects may vary, all her images possess a striking sense of vitality, often championing the bright colors, bold silhouettes, and energetic pairings that define her uplifting personal style.

Mecca James-Williams 


Having worked her way up from assisting in fashion closets (her first “proper” gig was working as Giovanna Battaglia Engelbert’s first assistant while at Vogue Japan), Mecca James-Williams now runs a successful styling business spanning fashion, celebrity, beauty, and more. She’s styled politician Stacey Abrams, worked on Solange’s visual album, and has styled numerous editorial features for publications ranging from The Zoe Report to Essence and The Wall Street Journal magazine. While her subjects may vary, all her images possess a striking sense of vitality, often championing the bright colors, bold silhouettes, and energetic pairings that define her uplifting personal style.

HOW DO YOU DEFINE YOUR STYLE?

Bright, bold, and modern. I love combining colors with classic silhouettes and funky, fun accessories. I love to accentuate my full curves with pieces that drape and shape. My style evolves with time: as life changes, so does my wardrobe.
 

THE WORLD’S BEST DRESSED?

Grace Jones, Tracee Ellis Ross, Rihanna, my mother in the ‘90s.
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

A high-waisted trouser, bodysuit, and pair of boots with a trench coat. I’ll layer it with a simple knit, and switch the boot out with sneakers some days. I typically wear these pieces daily when on set working, or when I’m running around the city.


WHAT ARE YOU BUYING?

Lifetime pieces, ones that I can pass down to my niece or future daughter. Being indoors so much now, I am shopping a lot less, but when I do shop, it’s for pieces that truly can shape my wardrobe or have some significance.
 

HOW DO YOU DEFINE YOUR STYLE?

Bright, bold, and modern. I love combining colors with classic silhouettes and funky, fun accessories. I love to accentuate my full curves with pieces that drape and shape. My style evolves with time: as life changes, so does my wardrobe.
 

THE WORLD’S BEST DRESSED?

Grace Jones, Tracee Ellis Ross, Rihanna, my mother in the ‘90s.
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

A high-waisted trouser, bodysuit, and pair of boots with a trench coat. I’ll layer it with a simple knit, and switch the boot out with sneakers some days. I typically wear these pieces daily when on set working, or when I’m running around the city.


WHAT ARE YOU BUYING?

Lifetime pieces, ones that I can pass down to my niece or future daughter. Being indoors so much now, I am shopping a lot less, but when I do shop, it’s for pieces that truly can shape my wardrobe or have some significance.
 

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HOW HAS QUARANTINE IMPACTED WHAT YOU WEAR?

I’ve thoroughly embraced the athleisure trend. It wasn’t my favorite pre-COVID, but nowadays a tailored trouser and sneaker are my go-tos.
 

HOW DO YOU PLAN ON TACKLING FESTIVE DRESSING?

I plan to keep it simple with a silk or satin dress and accessories that sparkle.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

When in doubt, grab a pair of denim jeans, a T-shirt, and a bold shoe. I think effortless style comes from comfort, confidence, and understanding your mood at that time.


WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT FASHION?

The freedom—to be who you want to be, to determine how you show up, and to live in that truth. Fashion is a beautiful community of creatives that really honors individualism. It provides outlets to people and cultures to express themselves freely. Fashion is pretty fulfilling in that sense, and truly gives me hope for its future.
 

HOW HAS QUARANTINE IMPACTED WHAT YOU WEAR?

I’ve thoroughly embraced the athleisure trend. It wasn’t my favorite pre-COVID, but nowadays a tailored trouser and sneaker are my go-tos.
 

HOW DO YOU PLAN ON TACKLING FESTIVE DRESSING?

I plan to keep it simple with a silk or satin dress and accessories that sparkle.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

When in doubt, grab a pair of denim jeans, a T-shirt, and a bold shoe. I think effortless style comes from comfort, confidence, and understanding your mood at that time.


WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT FASHION?

The freedom—to be who you want to be, to determine how you show up, and to live in that truth. Fashion is a beautiful community of creatives that really honors individualism. It provides outlets to people and cultures to express themselves freely. Fashion is pretty fulfilling in that sense, and truly gives me hope for its future.
 

Jaime Kay Waxman 


Fashion Editor Jaime Kay Waxman doesn’t see the world the way most of us do. She’s best known for concocting fanciful ensembles that tend to carry an otherworldly, slightly subversive allure. (Among the projects she looks back on most fondly is a surrealist tribute to director Pedro Almodóvar for Vogue Spain, which she shot with photographer Camila Falquez.) While a sense of whimsy may be her signature, Waxman is sought after for her ability to cast her subjects—who range from Serena Williams and Florence Welch to Beth Ditto and Amy Sedaris—in a refreshingly novel light. In doing so, she crafts images that offer a previously unseen lens on the world’s most iconic figures.

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Jaime Kay Waxman 


Fashion Editor Jaime Kay Waxman doesn’t see the world the way most of us do. She’s best known for concocting fanciful ensembles that tend to carry an otherworldly, slightly subversive allure. (Among the projects she looks back on most fondly is a surrealist tribute to director Pedro Almodóvar for Vogue Spain, which she shot with photographer Camila Falquez.) While a sense of whimsy may be her signature, Waxman is sought after for her ability to cast her subjects—who range from Serena Williams and Florence Welch to Beth Ditto and Amy Sedaris—in a refreshingly novel light. In doing so, she crafts images that offer a previously unseen lens on the world’s most iconic figures.

Editorial Image
Jaime Kay Waxman 


Fashion Editor Jaime Kay Waxman doesn’t see the world the way most of us do. She’s best known for concocting fanciful ensembles that tend to carry an otherworldly, slightly subversive allure. (Among the projects she looks back on most fondly is a surrealist tribute to director Pedro Almodóvar for Vogue Spain, which she shot with photographer Camila Falquez.) While a sense of whimsy may be her signature, Waxman is sought after for her ability to cast her subjects—who range from Serena Williams and Florence Welch to Beth Ditto and Amy Sedaris—in a refreshingly novel light. In doing so, she crafts images that offer a previously unseen lens on the world’s most iconic figures.

Jaime Kay Waxman 


Fashion Editor Jaime Kay Waxman doesn’t see the world the way most of us do. She’s best known for concocting fanciful ensembles that tend to carry an otherworldly, slightly subversive allure. (Among the projects she looks back on most fondly is a surrealist tribute to director Pedro Almodóvar for Vogue Spain, which she shot with photographer Camila Falquez.) While a sense of whimsy may be her signature, Waxman is sought after for her ability to cast her subjects—who range from Serena Williams and Florence Welch to Beth Ditto and Amy Sedaris—in a refreshingly novel light. In doing so, she crafts images that offer a previously unseen lens on the world’s most iconic figures.

HOW DO YOU DEFINE YOUR STYLE?

Subversive femininity mingled with refined menswear. I love classic tailoring, oversized suiting, and knits, but also gravitate to the happy textures and shapes of over-the-top, doll-like pieces. I always joke that my style is Helena Bonham Carter going to the grocery store; spontaneous but hopefully with a refinement and sense of humor!
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

Oversized trousers, simple knit tops, white loafers, and dark lug-sole boots. And of course a statement coat. In New York, you don’t drive a car so I think of my coat a bit like my “car.” I’m in it every day commuting, and it’s the first thing people see when I “pull up” at work. It’s my armor; it makes me feel at once chic and safe.
 
 
FAVORITE BRANDS?

Balenciaga, Bottega Veneta, Comme des Garçons, old Céline, JW Anderson, Loewe, Maison Margiela, Simone Rocha, Raf Simons.


HOW DO YOU DEFINE YOUR STYLE?

Subversive femininity mingled with refined menswear. I love classic tailoring, oversized suiting, and knits, but also gravitate to the happy textures and shapes of over-the-top, doll-like pieces. I always joke that my style is Helena Bonham Carter going to the grocery store; spontaneous but hopefully with a refinement and sense of humor!
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

Oversized trousers, simple knit tops, white loafers, and dark lug-sole boots. And of course a statement coat. In New York, you don’t drive a car so I think of my coat a bit like my “car.” I’m in it every day commuting, and it’s the first thing people see when I “pull up” at work. It’s my armor; it makes me feel at once chic and safe.
 
 
FAVORITE BRANDS?

Balenciaga, Bottega Veneta, Comme des Garçons, old Céline, JW Anderson, Loewe, Maison Margiela, Simone Rocha, Raf Simons.


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THE WORLD’S BEST DRESSED?

This is an impossible question but I always swoon over every iteration of Patti Smith. I tend to be more inspired by photographs; the people in Peter Hujar’s “Lost Downtown” are a collection of wonderfully dressed people.
 

WHAT ARE YOU INVESTING IN THIS SEASON?

In the past, I invested in pieces that were timeless, but now in this peculiar zeitgeist, I’m investing in pieces that bring me joy. I’m loving playful shapes from Cecilie Bahnsen and Simone Rocha, shocks of neon from Bottega Veneta or Jacquemus...I want to find as much joy, even if it’s in quasi isolation!
 

HOW DO YOU PLAN ON TACKLING FESTIVE DRESSING?

I bought a beautiful white quilted cloque dress from Simone Rocha that feels really festive. Her whimsical dresses are intensely comfortable while celebratory and special which feels right in this moment.
 

THE PANDEMIC HAS AFFORDED A TIME OF PAUSE AND REFLECTION FOR THE FASHION INDUSTRY. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE THINGS CHANGE MOVING FORWARD?

I want to see a move away from excess, a move towards kindness both within the industry and with regards to the planet. I want to see a normalizing of every body shape, skin color, ability, gender identity...Fashion has a microphone and the ability to galvanize; I want to use it thoughtfully.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

Tailoring! It’s so easy and inexpensive to tailor something perfectly to your shape. Taking even one inch off of a trouser can change the shape and proportions completely and be wildly more flattering.


THE WORLD’S BEST DRESSED?

This is an impossible question but I always swoon over every iteration of Patti Smith. I tend to be more inspired by photographs; the people in Peter Hujar’s “Lost Downtown” are a collection of wonderfully dressed people.
 

WHAT ARE YOU INVESTING IN THIS SEASON?

In the past, I invested in pieces that were timeless, but now in this peculiar zeitgeist, I’m investing in pieces that bring me joy. I’m loving playful shapes from Cecilie Bahnsen and Simone Rocha, shocks of neon from Bottega Veneta or Jacquemus...I want to find as much joy, even if it’s in quasi isolation!
 

HOW DO YOU PLAN ON TACKLING FESTIVE DRESSING?

I bought a beautiful white quilted cloque dress from Simone Rocha that feels really festive. Her whimsical dresses are intensely comfortable while celebratory and special which feels right in this moment.
 

THE PANDEMIC HAS AFFORDED A TIME OF PAUSE AND REFLECTION FOR THE FASHION INDUSTRY. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE THINGS CHANGE MOVING FORWARD?

I want to see a move away from excess, a move towards kindness both within the industry and with regards to the planet. I want to see a normalizing of every body shape, skin color, ability, gender identity...Fashion has a microphone and the ability to galvanize; I want to use it thoughtfully.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

Tailoring! It’s so easy and inexpensive to tailor something perfectly to your shape. Taking even one inch off of a trouser can change the shape and proportions completely and be wildly more flattering.


Jessica Willis 


“Cool” is famously hard to define, but—whatever it is—Jessica Willis is it. The self-taught talent boasts an enviable portfolio spanning ad campaigns that stand tall in Times Square, styling Haitian-Japanese tennis star Naomi Osaka (for the cover of Wall Street Journal Magazine, no less), and upcoming editorials for British Vogue and musicians Childish Gambino, Kelela, and Solange. Her work strikes a seamless balance between edgy and avant-garde and a chic sophistication. And naturally, her wardrobe follows suit. Think: a statement shearling (it’s old Céline—we asked), combat boots by Daniel Lee’s Bottega Veneta, and tailored separates by Peter Do—her favorite new talent who famously got his start on Phoebe Philo’s team at Céline.

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Jessica Willis 


“Cool” is famously hard to define, but—whatever it is—Jessica Willis is it. The self-taught talent boasts an enviable portfolio spanning ad campaigns that stand tall in Times Square, styling Haitian-Japanese tennis star Naomi Osaka (for the cover of Wall Street Journal Magazine, no less), and upcoming editorials for British Vogue and musicians Childish Gambino, Kelela, and Solange. Her work strikes a seamless balance between edgy and avant-garde and a chic sophistication. And naturally, her wardrobe follows suit. Think: a statement shearling (it’s old Céline—we asked), combat boots by Daniel Lee’s Bottega Veneta, and tailored separates by Peter Do—her favorite new talent who famously got his start on Phoebe Philo’s team at Céline.

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Jessica Willis 


“Cool” is famously hard to define, but—whatever it is—Jessica Willis is it. The self-taught talent boasts an enviable portfolio spanning ad campaigns that stand tall in Times Square, styling Haitian-Japanese tennis star Naomi Osaka (for the cover of Wall Street Journal Magazine, no less), and upcoming editorials for British Vogue and musicians Childish Gambino, Kelela, and Solange. Her work strikes a seamless balance between edgy and avant-garde and a chic sophistication. And naturally, her wardrobe follows suit. Think: a statement shearling (it’s old Céline—we asked), combat boots by Daniel Lee’s Bottega Veneta, and tailored separates by Peter Do—her favorite new talent who famously got his start on Phoebe Philo’s team at Céline.

Jessica Willis 


“Cool” is famously hard to define, but—whatever it is—Jessica Willis is it. The self-taught talent boasts an enviable portfolio spanning ad campaigns that stand tall in Times Square, styling Haitian-Japanese tennis star Naomi Osaka (for the cover of Wall Street Journal Magazine, no less), and upcoming editorials for British Vogue and musicians Childish Gambino, Kelela, and Solange. Her work strikes a seamless balance between edgy and avant-garde and a chic sophistication. And naturally, her wardrobe follows suit. Think: a statement shearling (it’s old Céline—we asked), combat boots by Daniel Lee’s Bottega Veneta, and tailored separates by Peter Do—her favorite new talent who famously got his start on Phoebe Philo’s team at Céline.

YOUR STYLE IN THREE WORDS?

Timeless, sleek, and effortless.
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

Right now, I’m really into wearing leather on leather.
 

THE WORLD’S BEST DRESSED?

First person that pops into my head is André 3000. He’s an actual style icon; his range has always been impeccable. Also the Olsen twins, who are always effortlessly chic and an ICONIC duo.


WHAT ARE YOU BUYING?

Every fall season, I invest in a great boot and coat. But this season in particular, I’ve been stocking up on trenches. My two favorite trenches right now are my tan leather trench from a new Georgian brand called Situationist and my “everyday” trench from Peter Do. These two are in heavy rotation along with my Bottega Veneta combat boots.
 

YOUR STYLE IN THREE WORDS?

Timeless, sleek, and effortless.
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

Right now, I’m really into wearing leather on leather.
 

THE WORLD’S BEST DRESSED?

First person that pops into my head is André 3000. He’s an actual style icon; his range has always been impeccable. Also the Olsen twins, who are always effortlessly chic and an ICONIC duo.


WHAT ARE YOU BUYING?

Every fall season, I invest in a great boot and coat. But this season in particular, I’ve been stocking up on trenches. My two favorite trenches right now are my tan leather trench from a new Georgian brand called Situationist and my “everyday” trench from Peter Do. These two are in heavy rotation along with my Bottega Veneta combat boots.
 

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Editorial Image
YOUR FAVORITE BRANDS?

Daniel Lee’s new Bottega Veneta, Jil Sander, The Row, Lemaire, and Loewe.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

Not sure if it’s a trick or more of something to live by. I always dress for comfort. I feel like I’m the most confident and at my best when I’m comfortable; when I know I can eat and expand a bit without my clothes becoming too tight, when I know I can stand for a while or walk around easily without shoes that are hindering and painful. Dressing comfortably does not mean that you have to compromise style.
 

THE PANDEMIC HAS AFFORDED A TIME OF PAUSE AND REFLECTION FOR THE FASHION INDUSTRY. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE THINGS CHANGE MOVING FORWARD?

I would love to see things actually slow down in the industry to allow time for complete thought process and creativity. I also would love to see more of an emphasis on quality and craftsmanship.


SOMETHING YOU’D NEVER WEAR?

A body-con dress, lol.
 

YOUR FAVORITE BRANDS?

Daniel Lee’s new Bottega Veneta, Jil Sander, The Row, Lemaire, and Loewe.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

Not sure if it’s a trick or more of something to live by. I always dress for comfort. I feel like I’m the most confident and at my best when I’m comfortable; when I know I can eat and expand a bit without my clothes becoming too tight, when I know I can stand for a while or walk around easily without shoes that are hindering and painful. Dressing comfortably does not mean that you have to compromise style.
 

THE PANDEMIC HAS AFFORDED A TIME OF PAUSE AND REFLECTION FOR THE FASHION INDUSTRY. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE THINGS CHANGE MOVING FORWARD?

I would love to see things actually slow down in the industry to allow time for complete thought process and creativity. I also would love to see more of an emphasis on quality and craftsmanship.


SOMETHING YOU’D NEVER WEAR?

A body-con dress, lol.
 

 
Caitlin Burke 
 

Our beloved Style and Content Director, Caitlin Burke worked as a stylist and editor for eight years, first cutting her teeth as an assistant at Cosmopolitan before moving on to become Fashion Editor at Harper's Bazaar International. Over the past seven years at Moda she's turned her hand at everything from styling LSD to editorials, runways shows, and content creation. Caitlin is also the office go-to for any fashion emergency, always ready to lend her hard-earned insider tips, whether that’s how to master a new trend (more on that below) or how to execute a fashionable Halloween look. When not in costume, she’s wearing minimalist separates from Jacquemus and Toteme, chunky gold chains, and something from Bottega Veneta.

Editorial Image
 
Caitlin Burke 
 

Our beloved Style and Content Director, Caitlin Burke worked as a stylist and editor for eight years, first cutting her teeth as an assistant at Cosmopolitan before moving on to become Fashion Editor at Harper's Bazaar International. Over the past seven years at Moda she's turned her hand at everything from styling LSD to editorials, runways shows, and content creation. Caitlin is also the office go-to for any fashion emergency, always ready to lend her hard-earned insider tips, whether that’s how to master a new trend (more on that below) or how to execute a fashionable Halloween look. When not in costume, she’s wearing minimalist separates from Jacquemus and Toteme, chunky gold chains, and something from Bottega Veneta.

Editorial Image
Caitlin Burke 
 

Our beloved Style and Content Director, Caitlin Burke worked as a stylist and editor for eight years, first cutting her teeth as an assistant at Cosmopolitan before moving on to become Fashion Editor at Harper's Bazaar International. Over the past seven years at Moda she's turned her hand at everything from styling LSD to editorials, runways shows and content creation. Caitlin is also the office go-to for any fashion emergency, always ready to lend her hard-earned insider tips, whether that’s how to master a new trend (more on that below) or how to execute a fashionable Halloween look. When not in costume, she’s wearing minimalist separates from Jacquemus and Toteme, chunky gold chains, and something from Bottega Veneta.

Caitlin Burke 
 

Our beloved Style and Content Director, Caitlin Burke worked as a stylist and editor for eight years, first cutting her teeth as an assistant at Cosmopolitan before moving on to become Fashion Editor at Harper's Bazaar International. Over the past seven years at Moda she's turned her hand at everything from styling LSD to editorials, runways shows and content creation. Caitlin is also the office go-to for any fashion emergency, always ready to lend her hard-earned insider tips, whether that’s how to master a new trend (more on that below) or how to execute a fashionable Halloween look. When not in costume, she’s wearing minimalist separates from Jacquemus and Toteme, chunky gold chains, and something from Bottega Veneta.

HOW DO YOU DEFINE YOUR STYLE?

I would say artfully minimalist. I don’t like much pattern or color usually, but I’m drawn to interesting shapes and artful details—and always some element of surprise.
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

I’m very into a relaxed “dad jean” at the moment (SLVRLAKE’s London style is a favorite)—a little bit lower rise than I’m used to, slightly baggy, and bootcut—paired with literally everything from a dressy top and heels to an oversized button-down and flat boot. They make everything feel a bit more effortless and cool.
 
 
FAVORITE BRANDS?

Prada, Marc Jacobs, and Jacquemus. I also love the artistry of Simone Rocha, Rodarte, and Richard Quinn. And Jonathan Anderson’s work for Loewe and JW Anderson is a favorite for both my work and my wardrobe. Oh and Daniel Lee for Bottega Veneta can do no wrong.


HOW DO YOU DEFINE YOUR STYLE?

I would say artfully minimalist. I don’t like much pattern or color usually, but I’m drawn to interesting shapes and artful details—and always some element of surprise.
 

CURRENT UNIFORM?

I’m very into a relaxed “dad jean” at the moment (SLVRLAKE’s London style is a favorite)—a little bit lower rise than I’m used to, slightly baggy, and bootcut—paired with literally everything from a dressy top and heels to an oversized button-down and flat boot. They make everything feel a bit more effortless and cool.
 
 
FAVORITE BRANDS?

Prada, Marc Jacobs, and Jacquemus. I also love the artistry of Simone Rocha, Rodarte, and Richard Quinn. And Jonathan Anderson’s work for Loewe and JW Anderson is a favorite for both my work and my wardrobe. Oh and Daniel Lee for Bottega Veneta can do no wrong.


Editorial Image
Editorial Image
HAS QUARANTINE IMPACTED WHAT YOU WEAR?

Yes and no. When I actually leave the house, I relish in the opportunity to dress up and be reunited with my old friends in my closet, so the way I dress for those occasions hasn’t changed much, except for maybe a greater sense of excitement and effort towards it all.
 

WHAT ARE YOU BUYING?

My shoes and accessories are feeling like they need an update. I plan to splurge on a Bottega cassette bag, as I’m craving a shoulder carryall to match my more practical style of dress these days.
 

ANY TRENDS YOU’RE EMBRACING?

The stompy boot and a lower-rise jean (something I never thought I’d say!). I think people will continue dressing more minimal and prioritizing comfort, but will rely on styling to make their outfits feel current and directional. Little details and styling tweaks can make practical staples feel fresh again, like wearing a sweater around your neck as a scarf, or opting for oversized fits.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

I have three! 1. Buy oversized, especially when it comes to blazers and outerwear. It always looks cooler, and oddly more flattering—plus, if The Row is any indication, it’s looking like that will be the way we all want to dress next season anyway. 2. Invest in good jewelry. Aim for one piece a year and before you know it, you’ll have your signature set that makes even your most basic pieces look special. 3. For more of a styling hack, try using hair ties over your sleeves when you want to push them up without having them constantly fall down—the folds in the fabric will hide the ties.
 

HOW DO YOU PLAN ON TACKLING HOLIDAY DRESSING?

Taking my fanciest tops and shoes and pairing them with relaxed jeans. It allows me to still wear my favorite over-the-top pieces, but with a grounding point that makes them appropriate for smaller gatherings.


HAS QUARANTINE IMPACTED WHAT YOU WEAR?

Yes and no. When I actually leave the house, I relish in the opportunity to dress up and be reunited with my old friends in my closet, so the way I dress for those occasions hasn’t changed much, except for maybe a greater sense of excitement and effort towards it all.
 

WHAT ARE YOU BUYING?

My shoes and accessories are feeling like they need an update. I plan to splurge on a Bottega cassette bag, as I’m craving a shoulder carryall to match my more practical style of dress these days.
 

ANY TRENDS YOU’RE EMBRACING?

The stompy boot and a lower-rise jean (something I never thought I’d say!). I think people will continue dressing more minimal and prioritizing comfort, but will rely on styling to make their outfits feel current and directional. Little details and styling tweaks can make practical staples feel fresh again, like wearing a sweater around your neck as a scarf, or opting for oversized fits.
 

YOUR BEST STYLIST TIP (THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO SHARE!)?

I have three! 1. Buy oversized, especially when it comes to blazers and outerwear. It always looks cooler, and oddly more flattering—plus, if The Row is any indication, it’s looking like that will be the way we all want to dress next season anyway. 2. Invest in good jewelry. Aim for one piece a year and before you know it, you’ll have your signature set that makes even your most basic pieces look special. 3. For more of a styling hack, try using hair ties over your sleeves when you want to push them up without having them constantly fall down—the folds in the fabric will hide the ties.
 

HOW DO YOU PLAN ON TACKLING HOLIDAY DRESSING?

Taking my fanciest tops and shoes and pairing them with relaxed jeans. It allows me to still wear my favorite over-the-top pieces, but with a grounding point that makes them appropriate for smaller gatherings.