WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2021
 
MODA Has Joined the
15 Percent Pledge
 
   
      
Today, we are proud to share that Moda Operandi has joined the 15 Percent Pledge to ensure 15% of our brand portfolio across womenswear, home, and fine jewelry is represented by Black businesses. Our goal is to connect our customers with more Black-owned brands and talent, and we will work in tandem with the pledge to make this a reality.    
 
“We are thrilled to partner with the 15 Percent Pledge and share the immense talent of Black designers with our customers,” says Lauren Santo Domingo, Co-Founder and Chief Brand Officer of Moda Operandi. “Through focused activism, Aurora James and the 15 Percent Pledge have demonstrated that what has been normalized is not acceptable. We are eager to work with The Pledge to reach this important goal.”   
  
To learn more about the 15 Percent Pledge, click the link below.     
 
LEARN MORE    
 
  
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2021
 
MODA Has Joined the
15 Percent Pledge
 
   
      
Today, we are proud to share that Moda Operandi has joined the 15 Percent Pledge to ensure 15% of our brand portfolio across womenswear, home, and fine jewelry is represented by Black businesses. Our goal is to connect our customers with more Black-owned brands and talent, and we will work in tandem with the pledge to make this a reality.    
 
“We are thrilled to partner with the 15 Percent Pledge and share the immense talent of Black designers with our customers,” says Lauren Santo Domingo, Co-Founder and Chief Brand Officer of Moda Operandi. “Through focused activism, Aurora James and the 15 Percent Pledge have demonstrated that what has been normalized is not acceptable. We are eager to work with The Pledge to reach this important goal.”   
  
To learn more about the 15 Percent Pledge, click the link below.     
 
LEARN MORE    
 
 
Issue #7: February
Black History Month Edition
 
  
PUBLISHED: Wednesday, February 3, 2021
 
   
    
Moda Operandi is committed to using our platform in support of Black and minority groups in the fashion industry and for championing progress. This page highlights educational resources and shares content that drives the change we wish to see in our society. In honor of Black History Month, our February issue reflects and celebrates the contributions of Black creatives to the fashion industry through the years, from history’s oft-forgotten talents deserving of recognition to the inspiring new names of today.   

  
 
Issue #7: February
Black History Month Edition
 
  
PUBLISHED: Wednesday, February 3, 2021
 
   
    
Moda Operandi is committed to using our platform in support of Black and minority groups in the fashion industry and for championing progress. This page highlights educational resources and shares content that drives the change we wish to see in our society. In honor of Black History Month, our February issue reflects and celebrates the contributions of Black creatives to the fashion industry through the years, from history’s oft-forgotten talents deserving of recognition to the inspiring new names of today.   

  



FORGOTTEN BLACK
FASHION ICONS
 
BY CRYSTAL TATE 
   
   
Do you recognize the name Ann Lowe? Few people know the Black designer created Jackie Kennedy’s wedding gown in 1953. Like so many Black creators, Ann Lowe was not recognized for her significant achievements during her lifetime. Here, meet six forgotten Black talents who have profoundly shaped the fashion industry.   


 





FORGOTTEN BLACK
FASHION ICONS
 
BY CRYSTAL TATE
 
  
Do you recognize the name Ann Lowe? Few people know the Black designer created Jackie Kennedy’s wedding gown in 1953. Like so many Black creators, Ann Lowe was not recognized for her significant achievements during her lifetime. Here, meet six forgotten Black talents who have profoundly shaped the fashion industry.   







FORGOTTEN BLACK
FASHION ICONS
 
BY CRYSTAL TATE
 
  
Do you recognize the name Ann Lowe? Few people know the Black designer created Jackie Kennedy’s wedding gown in 1953. Like so many Black creators, Ann Lowe was not recognized for her significant achievements during her lifetime. Here, meet six forgotten Black talents who have profoundly shaped the fashion industry.   







ELIZABETH KECKLEY 
 
Despite being born into slavery, Elizabeth Keckley started working as a seamstress and was eventually able to purchase her own freedom. Known for her clean lines and elegant designs, Keckley gained the attention of Mary Todd Lincoln, and became the favorite dressmaker of the former First Lady and political elite. Keckley ended up building a large-scale business and becoming an activist for formerly enslaved people. After her published autobiography led to a falling-out with Lincoln and being ostracized by the D.C. circle, Keckley left to become a fashion teacher at Wilberforce University, the country’s first private historically Black university.

 
LEARN MORE         




ELIZABETH KECKLEY 
 
Despite being born into slavery, Elizabeth Keckley started working as a seamstress and was eventually able to purchase her own freedom. Known for her clean lines and elegant designs, Keckley gained the attention of Mary Todd Lincoln, and became the favorite dressmaker of the former First Lady and political elite. Keckley ended up building a large-scale business and becoming an activist for formerly enslaved people. After her published autobiography led to a falling-out with Lincoln and being ostracized by the D.C. circle, Keckley left to become a fashion teacher at Wilberforce University, the country’s first private historically Black university.

 
LEARN MORE




ELIZABETH KECKLEY 
 
Despite being born into slavery, Elizabeth Keckley started working as a seamstress and was eventually able to purchase her own freedom. Known for her clean lines and elegant designs, Keckley gained the attention of Mary Todd Lincoln, and became the favorite dressmaker of the former First Lady and political elite. Keckley ended up building a large-scale business and becoming an activist for formerly enslaved people. After her published autobiography led to a falling-out with Lincoln and being ostracized by the D.C. circle, Keckley left to become a fashion teacher at Wilberforce University, the country’s first private historically Black university.

 
LEARN MORE